Hans-Peter Dürr
( 1987 , Germany )

...for his profound critique of the strategic defence initiative (SDI) and his work to convert high technology to peaceful uses.

Peace in its real sense can never be achieved by military measures or technical fixes... It is high time for us to focus our attention on the real problems which are threatening all of us...


Hans-Peter Dürr, born in 1929, was Director at the Max-Planck-Institute of Physics (Werner-Heisenberg-Institute) and Professor of Physics at the Ludwig Maximilian University, both in Munich, Germany. Appointed a Scientific Member of the Max-Planck-Society in 1963, he held the chair or vice-chair of the Board of this institute through the period 1971-1995.

Contact

Global Challenges Network e.V.
Frohschammerstra§e 14
80807 München
GERMANY

http://www.gcn.de/

Biography

Dürr was a quintessential transdisciplinarian. Besides his specialisms of nuclear physics, elementary particles and gravitation, epistemology and philosophy, he was professionally active in the fields of science and responsibility as well as energy policy. Since 1979 he spoke and demonstrated against nuclear energy and initiated study groups at various universities on ‘soft’ energy issues and community energy plans. More recently, he also became very concerned about economic, ecological and Third World questions. He was a member of the Board of Greenpeace-Germany (1985-91), of the Board and Scientific Committee of the Vienna Internationale Akademie für Zukunftsfragen (since 1990), a member of the International Advisory Council on the Economic Development of Hainan in Harmony with the Natural Environment in China (1990-93) and after the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 a co-founder of David gegen Goliath protesting against the construction of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plan in Bavaria.

In the 1980s, Dürr’s main campaigning work was pursued under the theme of peace. He became a Board member of the Vereinigung Deutscher Wissenschaftler and a member of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, joining the Council of the latter in 1987. He co-founded the Scientists’ Initiative: Responsibility for Peace in 1983, which led to the Scientists’ Peace Congress in Mainz attended by 3,300 scientists, and the ‘Mainzer Appell’, …

Dürr was a quintessential transdisciplinarian. Besides his specialisms of nuclear physics, elementary particles and gravitation, epistemology and philosophy, he was professionally active in the fields of science and responsibility as well as energy policy. Since 1979 he spoke and demonstrated against nuclear energy and initiated study groups at various universities on ‘soft’ energy issues and community energy plans. More recently, he also became very concerned about economic, ecological and Third World questions. He was a member of the Board of Greenpeace-Germany (1985-91), of the Board and Scientific Committee of the Vienna Internationale Akademie für Zukunftsfragen (since 1990), a member of the International Advisory Council on the Economic Development of Hainan in Harmony with the Natural Environment in China (1990-93) and after the Chernobyl disaster in 1986 a co-founder of David gegen Goliath protesting against the construction of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plan in Bavaria.

In the 1980s, Dürr’s main campaigning work was pursued under the theme of peace. He became a Board member of the Vereinigung Deutscher Wissenschaftler and a member of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, joining the Council of the latter in 1987. He co-founded the Scientists’ Initiative: Responsibility for Peace in 1983, which led to the Scientists’ Peace Congress in Mainz attended by 3,300 scientists, and the ‘Mainzer Appell’, a declaration against further nuclear armament. In 1990 another huge scientists’ convention in Göttingen warned against the militarisation of space. Out of these conventions came a series of lectures, which Dürr gave at many German universities.

Dürr was especially active on the issue of Non-offensive Defence and his main preoccupation, the American Strategic Defence Initiative (SDI), otherwise known as Star Wars. In 1985, he wrote a long article for the magazine ‘Der Spiegel’ arguing cogently against the feasibility of the SDI concept. And in 1986, he proposed a World Peace Initiative (WPI), on a similar scale to SDI, to solve the problems of the environment, world poverty and economic justice, as well as problems of peace itself.

The WPI idea was later reborn as the Global Challenges Network and the monies of the Right Livelihood Award were devoted to furthering it. After the fall of the Berlin wall, Dürr was involved in setting up two organisations with the aim of transforming 24 ecologically healthy, military-restricted areas along the former ‘iron curtain’ into an ‘ecological backbone’ of Europe.

Dürr was elected a member of the Club of Rome in 1991, and in 1996 he was a member of the UN Secretary General’s International Advisory Group for the Habitat II Conference in Istanbul. The main focus of his latest work was on questions concerning a sustainable, equitable and liveable society, emphasising efficiency and sufficiency in energy use as a point of entry.

In 2005, he co-authored the Potsdam Manifesto and the Potsdam Denkschrift as a follow-up to the Russel-Einstein-Manifesto of 1955. It was signed by a large group of scientists from all over the world, including 20 laureates of the Right Livelihood Award.

He received the Elise and Walter Haas International Award 1993 from the University of California. As a member of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, he received the Nobel Peace Price in 1995.
In 2002, the Cambridge Biographical Centre proclaimed Dürr International Scientist of the Year and he received an honorary degree of the University of Oldenburg. In 2004 he was awarded the German Federal Cross of Merit.

He passed away on May 18, 2014 at the age of 84.

 
 

FAQ about Hans-Peter Dürr

asked in 2005

1. Which of today’s scientific developments should rather be postponed or stopped?

Human power has become comparable in size to the natural forces on earth and gets more and more in the situation to destabilize the dynamically balanced biosystem. There appears the demand: “Obligation to be against nature”. Instead we have to demand: “Obligation to cooperate with nature”, which sets strict limits for the size of human manipulations. E.g. no manipulation with the logistics of the biosystem.

2. How can the increasing public distrust of science be overcome?

Economy and science are meant to serve the human being and all on which his/her existence depends, which means all living and its existential basis. Science has to demonstrate that it serves the “sustainability” in the sense that it lets the living become more alive. Then people will recover trust to science.

3. Do you see any chance that we can change our present course to escape disaster?

Yes! Do not start your judgement from obvious evidences, remembering: A falling tree makes more noise than a growing forest! Value creation is always slower than value destruction. You have to be patient. Get involved and you will feel that the negative pressure will get less, because you will meet wonderful people – all part of the growing forest!

4. Where does your opinion arise that people will ever cooperate enough to achieve solving these big problems?

Because we are by nature cooperative and empathic. The very reason that we do exist after three and a half billion years of evolution is a clear indication that we do have the potential of constructive connectedness.

5. What effect has the RLA had on your work?

More public recognition of the work I have done for decades before.

Publications

  • Das Lebendige lebendiger werden lassen. Wie uns neues Denken aus der Krise führt, Oekonom, München, 2011.
  • Warum es um das Ganze geht, Oekom, München, 2009.

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